Review: Tainted Night, Tainted Blood by E.S. Moore

27 Jun

Tainted Night, Tainted Blood by E.S. Moore
Kennsington (July 1, 2012)
Mass Market: $7.99; ebook: $6.99
ISBN: 9780758268730

Favorite Lines: “The body lay crumpled in the driveway–a heap of cloth that could have been anything if not for the distinctive smell that drifted on the light breeze.” (p. 1, ARC)

In the darkness, it’s easy to lose your way…

Kat Redding is a vampire with a job to do—wiping out the vamps and werewolves who prey on Pureblood humans. Someone has to do it…as long as that someone is her. But suddenly Kat, also known as Lady Death, has competition, and it’s causing problems. Vampire houses and werewolf clans alike are blaming her for a spate of gruesome murders, and Kat needs to figure out who’s really responsible before she becomes the next target…

On the hunt, she forms an uneasy alliance with both the Luna Cult and a powerful rogue werewolf. But the truths Kat’s uncovering—about her enemies and her few remaining confidantes—are far from comforting. And when the chance comes to leave her life of vengeance behind, Kat must decide whether her real motive lies in protecting the innocent, or sating her own fierce hungers…

I didn’t realize Tainted Night, Tainted Blood, was book two in E.S. Moore’s Kat Redding series until I had the ARC in hand. I feel rather silly about it since I bypassed book one, To Walk the Night, based on reader reviews I found posted online. Still, I tried to keep an open mind as I jumped into the world of Kat Redding. I’m glad I did.

Kat is a moody ass vampire. One minute she’s mellow and semi-easy to talk to, the next minute she’s ready to rip out someone’s throat. Some of the emotional manipulation is obviously coming from an outside source, but other times it’s all her. From facing her past to watching her dreams be devastated, Kat visits a long-range of emotions. She seems to make poor choice after poor choice without ever realizing there is more going on than her inner thoughts and feelings.

Had I read the previous book, I’d have understood the relationship between Kat and the other characters: Ethan, Adrian, Nathan and Jonathan. Moore explains the relationships, but I only know what he chose to tell me at the moment, not the very twisted, minute details of past interactions between the characters. I never experienced it for myself, so I really didn’t get the range of emotions past a superficial telling.

That really didn’t bother me though. If I focus solely on the story line I found it appealing. A vampire assassin, who happens to be a vampire, sees something strange. That leads to her confronting different aspects of herself, both present and past. She is driven in numerous directions, all which seem to be leading her to a very dark place all because she isn’t paying enough attention. Don’t get me wrong. One of those poor choices takes her to a new town where she meets new characters. I’m curious to know more, but a major event at the end of the story makes me wonder if I care enough about the heroine to read it.

Kat had my sympathy at times, but when she reacted without thought to that final situation it made me wonder why I care. The heroine doesn’t seem capable of deep feelings. She may care about someone, but I don’t know that it would ever be to the level I expect out of my heroine.

More than likely I’ll read book three, Blessed by a Demon’s Mark. I won’t run to Amazon or B&N when it comes out, but if I find it at the library, I’ll read it. I liked the action and the variety of directions the story could go, but I want more for my heroine than permanent PMS.

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